Privatization and Declining Access to BC Seniors' Care March 2017

PRIVATIZATION AND DECLINING ACCESS TO BC SENIORS’ CARE
An Urgent Call for Policy Change 

By Andrew Longhurst March 2017

Seniors benefit physically, mentally and emotionally when they can age at home. And when that’s not possible, quality assisted living and residential care are equally important. Having these essential services in place contributes to the most-effective use of our public health care resources and reduces pressure on hospital and emergency services—the most-expensive parts of the health care system.

For the past 16 years, underfunding, privatization and fragmentation of the system have left many seniors, their families and communities patching together care—and even going without.

Four previous CCPA–BC reports—published in 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2012—documented de- clining access to home and community care services in BC. Updated statistics obtained from the Ministry of Health for this report show the downward trend has continued.

Research shows ownership of residential care facilities affects care quality and staffing levels, and that for-profit residential care is generally inferior to care delivered in public or non-profit facilities.

To access the full report, click on: 
PRIVATIZATION AND DECLINING ACCESS TO BC SENIORS’ CARE